Oh, Canda: Alaskan Highway Safari, Part 2!

Hey, Bear!

On safari, it’s safest to stay in the vehicle. Yesterday, I witnessed one man learn that lesson the frightening way. I spotted a black bear on the right hand side of the road and pulled over to shoot it (with my lens, of course!) through my open car window. An RV coming from the other direction pulled over on the other side of the road and the driver got out, walked across the highway and proceeded to photograph the bear from right in front of my car.

Grumpy Bear, just before he charged!

The bear, digging for roots less than 20 feet away, looked up and scowled at the man, who kept shooting, oblivious, and just as I said, “hey you better get back” the bear charged! It was just a bluff charge and the man was able to scramble back to his RV, but he may have had to change his pants…

Once again, Canadian wildlife was out in force along the roadway! I lost count of black bears around 17 – still no Grizz sightings – saw two herds of buffalo and several lone bulls, two male stone sheep, three more moose, five caribou, and a few horses, all from the (relative) safety of the Raven. What a drive! :)

Alcan Traffic Jam! I didn’t know they had bison in Canada!

I love bison! They make me think of hairy dinosaurs.

Aww baby furry dinosaur!

Bison vs. Teardrop. The Teardrop is kind of bison-shaped, fortunately, they all ignored it. I once had a bison in Yellowstone walk right up to front of my car and snort at it. Terrifying!

Hello, Handsome. Male stone sheep, to go with the ladies and babies I saw the other day.

Caribou!

Bull Moose, again at a safe distance. Thank goodness.

Ok, these probably aren’t wild animals, but they are still beautiful.

My two black bears along the ice blue Laird River

The Alaskan Highway is magnificent!

Also check out my previous highway safari post for lots more Canadian wildlife photos!

About theblondecoyote

Mary Caperton Morton is a freelance science and travel writer with degrees in biology and geology and a master’s in science writing. A regular contributor to EARTH magazine, where her favorite beat is the Travels in Geology column, she has also written for the anthologies Best Women's Travel Writing 2010 and Best Travel Writing 2011. Mary is currently traveling the backroads from New Mexico to Alaska, writing and living out of a tiny Teardrop camper. When she’s not at the computer she can usually be found outside -- hiking, climbing mountains and taking photographs. Visit her website at www.marycapertonmorton.com.
This entry was posted in Beyond the USA, Bowie & D.O.G., Photography, Road tripping!, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

14 Responses to Oh, Canda: Alaskan Highway Safari, Part 2!

  1. Love the reflection of the bison in the car window with the teardrop in the back. I’m in line to get my own teardrop trailer! Your photos are beautiful. What kind of camera do you use? Stephanie

    • An Olympus E3, with a wide angle landscape lens or, for many of these shots, a telephoto. Great camera! It takes lovely photos and puts up with a lot of use and abuse! :)

  2. Pingback: Oh, Canada: Alaskan Highway Safari! « Travels with the Blonde Coyote

  3. umjmJOhn says:

    Thanks for sharing your adventures.

  4. tnkbuzan says:

    Beautiful, beautiful….am so enjoying your adventures and your perspectives on life!

  5. Now you know you got to what is needed to get the SHOT evenj if it means changing ones pants! LOL I am up here in NH dying laughing. I once wanted to get real close to a baby moose well the Mama had me running for my truck I was really feerless so no change needed just didn’t want her messing with my pretty truck lol

  6. Carrie says:

    I am so enjoying your travel adventures!! Having lived out west for many years, I can often place myself in your pictures. Tonight I go to sleep with the buffalo, young and old. Thank you.

  7. Brent says:

    My grandpa was a part of the Army Corps of Engineers that built that highway. It has been my dream, for years, to drive that from Washington state to Alaska. Now my 11 year-old son and I are planning to take that trip (someday)! Thanks for sharing your adventure! Makes me hungry to make ours happen.

  8. ritaroberts says:

    Wonderful,Wonderful stunning photo’s Mary. Your adventures get more dramatic as you go.You are a very brave lady amongst those huge animals. The horses are my favourite.Following you on your next journey.Thanks

  9. Moontree Ranch says:

    the baby bison is a great capture….nothing like being in the right spot at the right time…with camera in hand.

  10. Kenneth H Conley says:

    What is the reaction of your dogs when they see these wild beast, are they excited or just ho-hum?? I used to travel with a daschund (now deceased), and while travelling through a bison preserve in Kentucky, he looked out the window and started huffing and puffing with a noise I had never heard out of him before, but you could just tell he was scared to death!

  11. Dan Beideck says:

    One of my all time favorite hikes was an early morning, foggy hike in Yellowstone, ala the opening scene in ‘American Werewolf in London’. We kept hearing these unfamiliar sounds that were coming from what was a obviously a large animal. The sounds were tracking us as we kept moving, but we couldn’t see anything. Our imaginations were going a bit wild. Eventually, things cleared up and we came across open plains with a HUGE herd of buffalo, ala ‘Dances with wolves’. Turns out some of the bulls were returning to the herd along a parallel route to what we were taking and weren’t stalking us. They make some strange noises that I would not have associated with buffalo.

  12. Pingback: Oh, Canada: By the Numbers « Travels with the Blonde Coyote

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s