Ireland’s Northernmost Point: Treasure At Malin Head

Malin Head Agates

Malin Head Treasure

When I travel, I don’t buy a lot of souvenirs. Every now and then I’ll find something unique and delightful, but I’m not one to shell out for junk and knickknacks. Still, when I travel to exotic places like Ireland, I like to bring something back for my friends and family. Hiking out to Malin Head, Ireland’s northernmost point, way out on the Inishowen Peninsula, I found enough treasures to fill all my pockets. When I get home, everybody I know will get a little piece of Ireland!

The tip of the Inishowen Peninsula. I sat here for an hour, watching two seals that were watching me.

The tip of the Inishowen Peninsula. I sat here for an hour, watching two seals that kept popping up in the water just beyond the rocks, watching me. So curious! Aquatic dogs, I think.

My ride overlooking the Inishowen Peninsula

My ride, overlooking the Inishowen Peninsula. That’s Magilligan Point jutting out into Lough Foyle down below.

The start and finish of the Inishowen 100: a 100-kilometer loop around the Peninsula. It's not really meant to be a race, seeing as the road is one lane, two ways and really twisty.

The start and finish of the Inishowen 100: a 100-kilometer driving/ biking loop around the Peninsula. It’s not really meant to be a race, seeing as the road is one lane, runs two ways and is really twisty and tremendously scenic. Definitely worth a savory drive!

The "R" in a massive EIR painted on Malin Head to warm pilots they were over neutral territory in WWII.

The “R” in a massive EIR painted on Malin Head to warn pilots they were over neutral territory in WWII. Ballyhillin Beach, where I found all the rocks, is in the background.

One of many white stone glyphs spelled out on the ground around the EIR.

One of many white stone glyphs spelled out on the ground around the EIR.

Beach Sheep

Beach Sheep

Ballyhillin Beach!

Ballyhillin Beach! I had the place all to myself.

Pebble Beach

Pebble Beach

Green Agate! I might have to keep this one.

Green Agate! I might have to keep this one.

By the time I walked all the way across the beach, all my pockets were full of rocks!

By the time I walked all the way across the beach, all my pockets were full of rocks!

My week in Ireland has flown by! On to Dublin and then Scotland!

About theblondecoyote

Mary Caperton Morton is a freelance science and travel writer with degrees in biology and geology and a master’s in science writing. A regular contributor to EARTH magazine, where her favorite beat is the Travels in Geology column, she has also written for the anthologies Best Women's Travel Writing 2010 and Best Travel Writing 2011. Mary is currently traveling the backroads from New Mexico to Alaska, writing and living out of a tiny Teardrop camper. When she’s not at the computer she can usually be found outside -- hiking, climbing mountains and taking photographs. Visit her website at www.marycapertonmorton.com.
This entry was posted in Beyond the USA, Hiking!, Photography, Road tripping!, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to Ireland’s Northernmost Point: Treasure At Malin Head

  1. Donna says:

    Amazing! What’s the geologic story of all those beautiful stones?

  2. chris339 says:

    I bet the waves on the pebble beach sounded lovely!

  3. Oh those are some very nice rocks. I collect litltle ole rocks here in Texas and none are very pretty. Your rocks are gorgeous.

  4. :) my pockets would be full too!! I love pebbles!

  5. Andy says:

    I always pick things up along the way-stones, feathers, hedgehog skulls!

  6. I’m known for bringing home rocks and feathers and drift wood from our travels. Its a wonderful way to bring a piece of vacation home with me.

  7. ritaroberts says:

    Being interested in geology, that’s exactly what I do and my pockets are usually full of bits of rock and fossils if I’m lucky enough. I would have kept the agate myself Mary. Thanks for sharing

  8. Hi Mary – love the photos of the beach and the pebbles. I’m always bringing home rocks and would have also had a pocketful of those little gems. best to you, Carol

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