Oregon Cascades: Mount Thielsen!

Mount Thielsen

Mount Thielsen at first light

For a few years now, I’ve been calling the Pedernal in New Mexico my favorite mountain. The seemingly insurmountable flat-topped peak, made famous by Georgia O’Keeffe, was one of the first big mountains I onsighted and soloed. I first saw it in one of O’Keeffe’s paintings and said “I want to go up there” and then I drove up to northern New Mexico on my 27th birthday and climbed it. Now I might have a new favorite: Mount Thielsen in the Oregon Cascades!

Selfie with Mount Thielsen. I want to go up there! Three hours later, I was standing on the spire.

Selfie with Mount Thielsen. I want to go up there! Three hours later, I was standing on the spire.

I first saw Thielsen in 2005 on my very first road trip from Pennsylvania to Oregon. The spire is visible from Crater Lake but I’m sure it did not occur to me at the time that I might be able to go up there. In the 9 years since that first road trip, I have evolved from a woman who looks up at the mountains to one who climbs them.

The approach followed a moderately steep trail for 3 miles until it crossed over the Pacific Crest Trail and then followed a ridge up class 2 and 3 talus to the class 4 spire.

The approach followed a moderately steep trail for 3 miles until it crossed over the Pacific Crest Trail and then followed a ridge up class 2 and 3 talus to the class 4 summit spire. The trail runs up to the right of that tree around the right side of the hunk of rock.

Even now, with several years of mountaineering experience under my belt, I didn’t believe I could climb Thielsen until I was actually standing on top of it. That crazy witches hat of a peak is even more intimidating in person! But I’ve learned over the years how to draw power from a mountain, to let it reel me in, pulling me upwards and onwards until there’s no more up to go.

Dio negotiating the class 3 scramble to the summit spire. Diamond Lake and Mount Bailey in the background.

Dio negotiating the class 3 scramble to the summit spire. Diamond Lake and Mount Bailey in the background.

Dio just below Chicken Ledge, where the trail goes from steep class 3 to vertical class 4.

Dio just below Chicken Ledge, where the trail goes from steep class 3 to vertical class 4. I poured out some water for him and laid down my jacket and he waited for me at the base of the spire.  We were the first ones on the trail and the first up the mountain.

Selfie at the base of the summit spire

Selfie at the base of the summit spire. Easy climbing over an exposed, x-rated drop.

The Top!

Self portrait with Norman Thomas just below the top!

USGS marker on the summit

USGS marker on the summit, placed in 1955

Fulgerites aka petrified lightning on the summit spire. Thielsen is nicknamed the Lightning Rod of the Cascades. Glad I was up here on a clear day!

Fulgerites aka petrified lightning on the summit spire. Thielsen is nicknamed the Lightning Rod of the Cascades. Glad I was up here on a clear day!

The sheer 2,000 foot drop down to the Lathrop Glacier

The sheer 2,000 foot drop down to what’s left of the Lathrop Glacier

Self portrait with Diamond Lake

Self portrait with Diamond Lake and Mount Bailey

Hello Crater Lake! On clear days, supposedly uou can see down into the supernaturally blue waters , but there was too much smoke this day.

Hello Crater Lake! On clear days, supposedly you can see down into the supernaturally blue waters from the summit of Thielsen , but there was too much smoke from fires burning in northern CA.

After a month in Oregon, I’m remembering why I ended up living here for a year and a half. I love this state! I’m due in Washington to pick up a friend at the airport for a few days in the Olympics! Stay tuned…

Before heading north, I ran down the steep Cleetwood Cove trail to touch the blue waters of Crater Lake.

Walking on water over one of the Earth’s greatest cataclysms. Before heading north, I ran down the steep Cleetwood Cove trail to touch the blue waters of Crater Lake.

For more on Crater Lake, check out the Travels in Geology feature I wrote for EARTH magazine on Oregon’s only National Park.

 

About theblondecoyote

Mary Caperton Morton is a freelance science and travel writer with degrees in biology and geology and a master’s in science writing. A regular contributor to EARTH magazine, where her favorite beat is the Travels in Geology column, she has also written for the anthologies Best Women's Travel Writing 2010 and Best Travel Writing 2011. Mary is currently traveling the backroads from New Mexico to Alaska, writing and living out of a tiny Teardrop camper. When she’s not at the computer she can usually be found outside -- hiking, climbing mountains and taking photographs. Visit her website at www.marycapertonmorton.com.
This entry was posted in Bowie & D.O.G., Hiking!, Photography, Road tripping!, Uncategorized, Vagabonding 101 and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

17 Responses to Oregon Cascades: Mount Thielsen!

  1. Box Canyon Blogger Mark says:

    In younger days a “dare” ended with my friend and I skinny dipping in Crater Lake. Never felt water so cold, and yes, clear as glass. Just when we were furthest from the shore a Tourist Cruise Boat came chugging along. The tourists got some good “white-butt” photos I’m sure as we went racing back to shore.

  2. I love Georgia O’Keefe and the Pedernal, too! Your fabulous pictures on this climb makes me want to plan a trip. Wow! What a beautiful place!

  3. Another great adventure! Thanks for sharing photos and story. Clifford and I have recently done a couple one-week trips to western Montana, and we are planning on heading out for a 2-week trip to Canada in a couple of days, the beginnings of many more and longer road trips for us. Thanks for all the inspiration you’ve provided!

  4. pmdello says:

    You have so much fun!

    Thanks for taking us along on these adventures.

  5. gaucho8782 says:

    Wow, can tell you do a lot of hiking judging by your legs in that last photo! haha

  6. Upriverdavid says:

    I think WOW!..The photos from the top of the lightning rod apply…I never thought of anyone climbing to the top of that mountain….
    One hot summer day years ago, my brother and I dove off the rocks at the end of the lake trail. I can still remember I’m not going to touch bottom here, being only 5’6″.
    Sure felt good, then there was the climb back up.
    Thanks,
    David

  7. mvschulze says:

    Speechless, impressed, jealous, ….

  8. egghill says:

    Mary, I was at Crater Lake on Aug 8 and 9, watched part of the Rim Marathon and went out the road following the Umpqua River to the coast. It was my first visit to Oregon and it won’t be my last! Smoke clouded most of my photos too, but I haven’t posted about it yet – probably later this week. Beautiful country – went on to the Washington Cascades for three great hikes – postings to come.

  9. wishkah says:

    Hi Mary, I found your blog using the WordPress reader. Great stories, photos and a good inspiration! We are traveling the east coast and, after reaching Key West, going to Vancouver. Have a great time

  10. James Miska says:

    Oregon sure looks beautiful from up there

  11. rynob15 says:

    Beautiful Mountain I wish I could visit it xD

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